The Queen and Her Corgis – A Love Story

Have you ever wondered whether the Queen is a hands-on dog owner? Queen Elizabeth II is known for her love of hounds, with a particular fondness for the Welsh Corgi breed. She has owned Corgi’s all her life, the first of which, Dookie, was a gift from her father, King George VI.

Her second corgi, Susan, was a gift for her 18th birthday. Susan was the beginning of the long breeding line of royal corgis. Since then, the Queen has owned more than 30 Corgis.

There are actually two breeds of Welsh Corgi. The Pembroke Welsh Corgi and Cardigan Welsh Corgi. They look very similar, but according to the American Kennel Club they are different in many ways.

Pembroke Welsh Corgi

Pembroke

These intelligent cattle herding dogs were introduced to Pembrokeshire in Wales by the Vikings, around 1000AD. They are known as a dwarf breed. The word corgi is welsh for dwarf dog. They have long bodies and short legs, as do the Cardigan Corgis.

The Pembroke Corgi is an excellent companion, preferring to be with their owner. They are easy to train because they love to please.

They have a lot of energy, are playful and fun-loving and always ready for a game or a walk.

Cardigan Welsh Corgi

Cardigan

The Cardigan Corgi was introduced to Britain 2000 years before Pembroke Corgis, and came from central Europe. They have historically been allowed to keep their tails, unlike the Pembroke, who has been docked until the practice became illegal.

Cardigans are thought to be a little more serious and thoughtful than their corgi counterparts, but they are still a loyal, intelligent, playful pet. They are also very good guard dogs.

Their coats can be many colors, brindle, black and white, red and sable with white markings, and mottled blue. They are often darker than the usual red and white of the Pembroke.

Where Do The Queen’s Dogs Live?

The Queen, who refers to her dogs as ‘her family’ has a special room set aside at Buckingham Palace. It’s called the Corgi Room. Here the dogs have space to play, as well as sleeping on their raised wicker beds.

There are acres of ground outside for the dogs to roam, and they have often been seen outside with palace staff, as well as members of the royal family.

What Does The Queen Feed Her Dogs?

Former royal chef, Darren McGrady, who has cooked for the Queen, Princess Diana, and the royal dogs was interviewed by Hello! Magazine. The dog menu consisted of alternating days of beef, chicken, lamb, and rabbit. The fresh meat was poached and chopped finely to ensure no bones were left behind.

The dogs enjoyed a strict routine, said Darren. Every day the Queen’s footman picked up the dog food from the kitchen in the mid-afternoon. It was then taken to the corgi room, where often the Queen would go to feed them herself.

Does The Queen Walk Her Dogs?

The Queen walks her dogs whenever she is at home. She has always been active and enjoys exercising with all her animals, be they dogs or horses.

What Does The Queen Call Her Dogs?

The names of the Queen’s dogs are many and variable. Here are just some of those used for her beloved hounds.

  • Dookie
  • Jane
  • Susan
  • Sugar
  • Honey
  • Spick
  • Span
  • Whiskey
  • Sherry
  • Cider
  • Monty
  • Heather
  • Emma
  • Willow
  • Vulcan
  • Candy

Do All Members Of The Royal Family Love The Dogs?

The whole family is very fond of all dogs, but Princes William and Harry have openly commented on the excessive barking from the royal corgis. Some of the staff have also been irritated by the dogs. One footman was demoted after he was caught spiking the dogs food and water with alcohol, in retaliation for them barking and snapping.

Final Thoughts

It can only be positive to have people of such high profile, openly demonstrating a love for their dogs, and being seen to care for them deeply. The British Monarchy is held in high esteem in Great Britain and the Commonwealth. They are loved and watched in America and world-wide.

It’s vital that influential people lead by example, and the Queen continues to do that with her dogs.

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